The colloquium

The Colloquium provides a space for creative and innovative expressions that capture themes and debates furthering the study of gender. This stream will also publish work-in-progress papers, conference papers and position papers. Work produced from IGS (and affiliated institutions) activities – such as conference and workshop reports – can also be published here. Submissions to this stream will be reviewed and edited by OxFEP Editors. The aim of this stream is to invite discussion and feedback on this work from the wider academic community.

If you would like OxFEP to feature your work, please contact us at epresseditor@gmail.com 


Recent Works-in-Progress

Had you been in Soweto forty years to the day of our exhibition closing, on 16 June 1976, you would have seen about 10,000 pupils, girls and boys, on a ‘long march’ at great risk. The two-week protest to improve their schooling was disrupted by government bullets, killing hundreds and injuring more. In 1991, to commemorate the rights for which these youngsters fought, the Organization of African Unity designated June 16th as the Day of the African Child — auspicious for our event.

As the struggle for learning goes on, FGM has now been accepted as a subject in some schools. But how should it be taught? What curriculum is best? Among strategies of choice, art is a privileged medium.

Download the Full Article

HOW TO CITE THIS ARTICLE
Levin, Tobe. 2016. Through the Eyes of Nigerian Artists – Confronting FGM REPORT ON An international travelling exhibition. Oxford: The IGS Feminist E-Press
ABOUT THE AUTHOR(S)
Dr Tobe Levin

Associate, Hutchins Center – Harvard University, Affiliate Member at Lady Margaret Hall, University of Oxford, FGM Activist & Publisher


The Oxford–Myanmar Policy Brief Series

Burmese language version inside 

DR. DAW MAR MAR KYI KHIN (EDITOR)

DR. MATTHEW WALTON (EDITOR)

5 December 2016
ISBN 978-1-912071-70-8

On Monday 15 February 2016, the Programme on Modern Burmese Studies at St Antony’s College and the International Gender Studies Centre at Lady Margaret Hall convened a workshop entitled “Towards Democracy and Reconciliation: Challenges Facing Myanmar’s Incoming Government.” Co-organized by Dr Daw Khin Mar Mar Kyi and Dr Matthew J Walton, the workshop brought together over a dozen UK experts on Myanmar, drawn from academic, advocacy, and activist communities.

Sponsored by the Programme on Modern Burmese Studies at St Antony’s College and the International Gender Studies Centre at Lady Margaret Hall, University of Oxford.

ABSTRACT

Presenters focused on the challenges facing the new NLD-led government, identifying key stakeholders, persistent and emerging impediments, and potential policy responses. Subjects considered included military legacies, governance concerns, social issues, land and resource management, and conflict and displacement.

Please note that the views and positions presented in these briefs represent the authors and are not necessarily the views of the Programme on Modern Burmese Studies, St Antony’s College, the International Gender Studies Centre, Lady Margaret Hall, or the University of Oxford. In some cases, the views of different authors may diverge or conflict.

We believe that including multiple different perspectives in a collection of policy briefs is valuable in fostering public debate in Myanmar.

Download the Full Article

HOW TO CITE THIS ARTICLE
Daw Khin Mar Mar Kyi and Matthew J Walton (Eds.). 2016. The Oxford–Myanmar Policy Brief Series. Oxford-Myanmar Policy Brief Series, Oxford: The IGS Feminist E-Press 1(1).
ABOUT THE EDITOR(S)
Dr. Daw Mar Mar Kyi Khin
 

Dr Khin Mar Mar Kyi is the inaugural Daw Aung San Suu Kyi Gender Research Fellow, an award winning social anthropologist and Research Associate in Anthropology at the University of Oxford. She is the producer of an acclaimed documentary, Dreams of Dutiful Daughters (2013). She championed with a rare combination of her scholarly excellences, passionate humanitarian vision with technical visual skills.

Dr. Matthew Walton

Matthew Walton is Aung San Suu Kyi Senior Research Fellow in Modern Burmese Studies at St Antony’s College. He directs the Programme on Modern Burmese Studies and is the convener of the Southeast Asia seminar series, both at St Antony’s. His research focuses on religion and politics in Southeast Asia, with a special emphasis on Buddhism in Myanmar. He is currently a senior policy consultant to The Elders on Myanmar issues and regularly briefs diplomats and NGOs on politics in Myanmar. Matt is also one of the co-founders of the Myanmar Media and Society (M.MAS) project and of the Oxford-Myanmar blog Tea Circle.


Radical leisure and division of labour: is there life beyond necessity?

The case of undocumented Georgian migrant women in London

DR MAIA BARKAIA

1 December 2016
ISBN 978-1-912071-72-2
This is a draft paper based on my pilot field study in London. It will serve as a foundation for my larger ethnographic study, which will allow me to explore how to radically rethink the gendered political economy of time.
ABSTRACT

In this paper, I explore how work and leisure are structured by a gendered political economy of time. For this reason, first and foremost, as part of the preliminary exploration, I focus on the case of undocumented Georgian migrant workers in London, which will allow me to articulate the theory with the help of some illustrative data. Secondly, I examine the existing theoretical debates and literature on time, leisure and work. The preliminary exploration sets up the foundation for a larger research project that will focus on subaltern women’s experiences of temporal autonomy in Georgia. The case of undocumented migrant women, who are the most visible representatives of subalternity, helped me to shape my theoretical framework and discover new research questions for my future research project that aims to decipher the relation between subalternity, informal work and gendered political economy of time.

Download the Full Article

HOW TO CITE THIS ARTICLE
Barkaia, Maia. 2016. Radical leisure and division of labour: is there life beyond necessity? The case of undocumented Georgian migrant women in London. Oxford: The IGS Feminst E-Press.
 
ABOUT THE AUTHOR(S)
Dr Maia Barkaia
Invited Lecturer, Institute for Gender Studies, Tbilisi State University; Researcher, Human Rights Education and Monitoring Centre (EMC)